LMTAAA Offices are CLOSED to the public. Please call toll free at 1-888-545-0910 for assistance:

FAQs

Are there legal services for low income seniors?+

Does LMTAAA offer classes to learn how to be a better caregiver and how do I participate?+

LMTAAA offers classes for unpaid family caregivers throughout the year. Call 360-664-3162 ext. 102 and ask to subscribe to our newsletter to learn when classes are held. Here are some examples of the classes we offer.

Powerful Tools for Caregivers is a 6-week scripted, self-care education program for family caregivers. The goal is to provide caregivers tools and strategies to better handle the unique challenges caregivers face.

Dementia Study Group is a psych education-based class that focuses on problem solving dementia related behaviors. We like to say, “Come with questions, leave with answers.”

Ask-A-Nurse is an educational, question-and-answer session where an LMTAAA staff Registered Nurse answers questions from caregivers regarding health-related concerns.

How can family members be cared for in their own home?+

Many caregivers recruit family members, friends or members of their faith community to assist in caring for a family member. Care can also be paid for privately through a home care agency. Home care agencies provide different levels of care that may include house cleaning services, errands, bathing and meal preparation. 

A representative from the home care agency will often come to the home to assess the needs, formulate a plan and match the best caregiver to help. There are often a minimum number of hours per visit which varies by agency. Hourly rates for in-home care are generally between $22 and $38 per hour.

How can I make sure my family member’s care needs are met and last wishes respected?+

There are different ways in which your family member’s wishes can be respected including:

Advance Care Plan (ACP) is a health care directive which lets you state what kind of medical treatments you do or do not wish to have if you are terminally ill or permanently unconscious.  The ACP also lets you write down your health care values and other directives to your medical providers.

The Physicians Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST) is a printed form when completed, represents a summary of wishes a person has regarding end of life treatment. The POLST is a physician’s order to communicate your wishes to emergency personnel and health care workers. The form must be signed by a physician, Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner, or Physician Assistant who assume responsibility for its accuracy.

Palliative Care is specialized medical care for people living with a serious illness. This type of care is focused on providing relief from the symptoms and stress of the illness. The goal is to improve quality of life for both the patient and the family.

Hospice provides compassionate physical, emotional, and spiritual care to people nearing the end of their lives, including support for their family and friends.

How do I get my family member to stop driving?+

Talk to the doctor about your concerns. They may be able to write a letter to the Department of Licensing requesting that your family member no longer drive due to their health condition.

Submit a driver evaluation request form from the Department of Licensing. DOL will review the request and may ask your family member to retake the driving test. Visit http://www.dol.wa.gov/driverslicense/reportunsafe.html for more information.

Request a comprehensive driver evaluation from a certified evaluator, such as an occupational therapist.

How is dementia diagnosed and who specializes in dementia treatment?+

Neurologists specialize in diseases of the brain and the nervous system. Psychiatrists specialize in disorders that affect the mood or the way the brain works. Psychologists have special training in testing memory and other mental functions. General Practitioners can also diagnose and care for individuals with cognitive disorders.

To diagnose dementia, a thorough medical history is reviewed. Also, mental status testing, physical and neurological exams, blood tests, and sometimes brain imaging is conducted to rule out other dementia-like symptoms. Ruling out other illnesses is important when trying to get to an accurate diagnosis.

The value of cognitive assessments and diagnosis of dementia is more widely appreciated, especially for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI).  MCI may or may not be associated with a dementia process, but early recognition of symptoms provides more treatment or palliative care options.

What is respite care?+

Respite care is a service where someone comes to your home to care for your family member, allowing you to take a break to do things like visit with friends or go to your own medical appointments. 

Respite care services may be provided by a friend, family members, and home care agencies or from the Family Caregiver Support Program. Often, Respite is provided by a combination of all of the above, especially when the caregiver’s burdens increase as the care receiver’s needs increase.

What options are there if my family member cannot be cared for at home?+

Assisted Living Facilities (ALF) are care facilities in a community setting staffed by trained personnel who provide for the well-being and safety of the residents. There are varying levels of assistance available, from meals and laundry, to personal assistance. The facilities can help people with mental health issues, developmental disabilities, or dementia. They generally have seven or more residents and are licensed by the state. More information is available at https://fortress.wa.gov/dshs/adsaapps/lookup/BHPubLookup.aspx

Adult Family Homes (AFH) are homes in regular neighborhoods where a staff assumes responsibility for the safety and well-being of the adults in their care. Those who stay in adult family homes are provided with a room, laundry, supervision, and varying levels of assistance as needed. Some nursing care can be provided. The homes are licensed by the state and generally have six or fewer residents. More information is available at https://fortress.wa.gov/dshs/adsaapps/lookup/AFHPubLookup.aspx

Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNF) provide 24-hour supervised nursing care, personal care, rehabilitative therapy, nutrition management, organized group activities, social services, laundry, room, and board. Skilled nursing facilities are licensed facilities which are certified and licensed by both federal and state agencies. More information is available at  fortress.wa.gov/dshs/adsaapps/lookup/NHPubLookup.aspx

Are there classes to learn how to be a better caregiver?+

The Family Caregiver Support Program offers classes for unpaid family caregivers throughout the year. Check out our calendar for classes or call 360-664-3162 ext. 102 for more information or registration. The following are some of the classes we offer.

Powerful Tools for Caregivers is a 6-week, self-care education program for family caregivers. The goal is to provide caregivers tools and strategies to better handle the unique challenges caregivers face.

Dementia Study Group is a psycho-educational class which focuses on problem-solving, dementia-related behaviors. We like to say, “Come with questions, and leave with answers.”

Dementia Skills Class is a two-part video series edited from Teepa Snow’s 2014 workshop at LMTAAA. The class presents selected skills and insights to help care for someone with dementia.

Advance Care Planning is a two-hour class covering what is and how to complete your own end of life care plan. 

Ask-A-Nurse is an educational, question-and-answer session where an LMTAAA staff Registered Nurse answers questions from caregivers regarding health-related concerns.

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